Tag Archives: Uber

Uber Freight Expanding Into Six Markets This Year

Truck

Uber Freight will expand to Arizona, California, Georgia, North and South Carolina and into the Midwest-Chicago area over the next few months after a test run that began in Texas.

“These new areas represent where drivers like to run, which makes sense: These regions including Texas cover over a quarter of the country’s drivers and freight,” the company wrote in a blog post. “Unlocking this geography allows more carriers and their drivers to grow their businesses with Uber Freight’s instant load booking and quick payment. While today we still have most of our loads in Texas, over the coming months drivers can expect to see an ever-increasing number of loads available on the app in these new markets.”

The transportation giant also said that it has heard from truck drivers who prefer to haul specific types of freight in specific lanes. As a result, Uber announced it will build new features to “automatically learn drivers’ preferences based on their past loads, their location, their home base, and more. When a new load is available that matches these preferences, the app will notify the driver.”

Uber has declined to publicly release data on the number of carriers and shipments brokered so far, but the group told USA Today that load counts have increased tenfold in Texas since January.

Story by Transport Topics

How Uber’s Technology Represents Progress for Trucking

Although trucking has a reputation as an industry that is conservative and slow to change, it actually is an early adopter of technology. CB radios were big with truckers long before they became popular with consumers. As international freight and logistics in all its forms – air, freight and rail – remains painfully offline, trucking has already hit its tech stride.

Transportation service provider YRC Worldwide, for example, is rapidly blending technology into its LTL, or less-than-truckload, hauling network, Justin Hall, the carrier’s customer service chief, said in recent industry remarks.

Both giant carriers and start-ups are deploying technology to reducing excess capacity and make trucking even more efficient. More than a baker’s dozen of “Uber-for-freight” start-ups were joined this year by Uber itself with a cloud-based, on-demand, full truck-load freight brokerage called Uber Freight.

This isn’t just a drive-by-night business. Freight tech start up Convoy – which has received seed funding from the founders of LinkedIn, eBay, Salesforce, Expedia and others – recently landed Unilever as a client, proving that the big boys are listening.

Even Amazon.com – whose founder Jeff Bezos also has invested in Convoy – has on-demand trucking aspirations.

Using technology to connect customers and truckers is far from a new idea.

U.S. domestic trucking has been shifting toward technology for nearly half a century. Truckers and customers used to coordinate loads through bulletin boards at truck stops. This was digitized when Dial-a-Truck, now called DAT, launched a telephone freight matching service in 1978, followed by an electronic version years later. Electronic load boards have since evolved into  $150-billion freight brokerage market with brokers leveraging sophisticated technology to manage both inbound and outbound shipments for clients.

Trucking in the United States has two key drivers – incredible infrastructure and outstanding technology. Together they helped lower the U.S.’s percentage of GDP spent on logistics to “only” 7.5 percent. That compares with around 18  percent in China and well over 20 percent in less developed countries.

In 2015, trucking revenue reached $726.4 billion, with 3.6 million trucks moving 10 billion tons of freight. That’s a lot of freight. But it can get more efficient. As a matter of fact, there are at least 10 on-demand freight companies that have billed themselves as an “Uber-for-freight”:

Story by Eytan Buchman

Uber’s CEO is out: Here’s everything that went wrong with Uber this year

As of early this morning, Uber CEO Travis Kalanick is out.

It’s the latest chapter in what has become perhaps the most enticing tech story of the year that, many might argue, begins with the bombshell blog by former Uber engineer Susan Fowler that reveals systemic sexism at Uber.

Things started to sour earlier this year, however. Here’s how it all went down:

Kalanick a lightning rod for Trump criticism

  • December 14: Reports reveal Kalanick is joining Trump’s business advisory board.

If that was a spark, what followed was a forest fire

  • February 19: Former Uber engineer Susan Fowler posts her now-famous blog post detailing sexism within the company.
  • February 20: Uber calls for an internal investigation, known as the “Holder investigation” after former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, who’s leading it.
  • February 23: Alphabet’s Waymo unit files a lawsuit against Uber claiming that a former Waymo employee, Anthony Levandowski, stole secrets related to autonomous vehicle technology.
  • February 27: Uber SVP of engineering Amit Singhal leaves the company after it was revealed that he had left Google a year earlier due to a “credible” sexual harassment complaint.
  • February 28: Travis Kalanick apologizes after he’s caught on film arguing with an Uber driver, Fawzi Kamel, about Uber’s new plans to lower fares. “Some people don’t like to take responsibility for their own s—. They blame everything in their life on somebody else. Good luck,” Kalanick told his driver.
  • March 3: The New York Times reveals that Uber has been using a feature named “Greyball” that showed people it suspected to be government officials a fake version of the app that would deny them a ride. This was used by Uber to operate in areas where its service was deemed illegal without being caught.

Exodus followed by more scandal

  • March 3: On the same day, Charlie Miller, Uber vice president of product and growth and self-driving senior engineer, leaves the company.
  • March 8: Artificial intelligence labs director Gary Marcus leaves the company.
  • March 16: Self-driving director Raffi Krikorian leaves.
  • March 19: Uber president Jeff Jones departs the company.
  • March 20: Uber’s vice president of maps and business platforms, Brian McClendon, leaves.
  • March 24: Gabi Holzwarth, who dated Kalanick for several years, revealed to The Information that she, Kalanick, and five Uber executives who had traveled to Seoul in 2014 visited an escort bar while there. A female marketing executive who was in the group told Holzwarth later that she felt Uber tried to silence her complaints.
  • May 15: Judge blocks Levandowski from working on any technology related to LIDAR, which is key to the development of Uber’s autonomous vehicles.
  • May 30: Uber fires Levandowski, stating that he didn’t fully cooperate with the court or with helping Uber to prove its case.
  • June 8: Bombshell letter reveals the type of boss Kalanick was. In the letter, dated 2013, Kalanick discusses a company trip to Miami and lays out ground rules for consensual employee sex practices. “Have a great f–king time,” he says.
  • June 1: Uber board meets to begin discussing the findings of the Holder report before it is released to the company. During the meeting, David Bonderman makes sexist remarks about women.

The Holder Investigation report is released

  • June 6: Uber says more than 20 staff members have been fired as part of the internal investigation.
  • June 13: The Holder report is released, and it makes 47 recommendations to help Uber improve its values and workplace environment. Kalanick, who recently lost his mother, decides to step away from the company temporarily. Uber says his duties will be replaced by an independent chair.
  • June 14: The Federal Trade Commission begins looking into Uber’s privacy practices, possibly digging deeper into the company’s “god view” tool and other concerns, according to Recode.
  • June 15: A rape victim filed a lawsuit against Uber after she found out that executives had taken her medical records. The 26-year-old woman was raped by an Uber driver in India in 2014, and the driver was convicted of the crime.

Travis Kalanick resigns

  • June 21: Founder and former CEO Travis Kalanick resigns. “I love Uber more than anything in the world and at this difficult moment in my personal life I have accepted the investors request to step aside so that Uber can go back to building rather than be distracted with another fight,” Kalanick said in a statement obtained by The New York Times.

Story by : Todd Haselton at Cnbc.com