Tag Archives: transportation

REEDTMS LOGISTICS RECEIVES SCOTTSMIRACLE-GRO TRANSPORTATION EXCELLENCE AWARD

ScottsMiracle-Gro presented Reed Transport Services, Inc. with its Transportation Excellence Award for 2017. ReedTMS Logistics is a leading asset-based third-party logistics provider who operates a multi-mode transportation network, which manages hundreds of shipments in North America weekly.

ScottsMiracle-Gro holds its core carriers to stringent service performance standards and relies on on-time deliveries to keep their business moving. The international consumer lawn and garden product company will be sending representatives to the ReedTMS headquarters in Tampa to celebrate the partnership between the organizations. The award marks the second time in three years that ReedTMS Logistics has been able to claim the prestigious award.

“Our employees strive to excel at serving our customers, and earning ScottsMiracle-Gro’s Transportation Excellence Award is a gratifying reward for their hard work.” said Jason Reed, ReedTMS CEO.

Reed Transport went above and beyond the typical call of duty, even relocating an employee to work on-site in order to dedicate his full attention to Scotts. For first six weeks of the project, Reed Transport had an employee helping with scheduling and tracking shipments on-site.

“Providing the best and most efficient service to our customers is at the core of everything we do. We hope to continue to grow this amazing relationship we have built with ScottsMiracle-Gro for a long time” said Mark Reed, ReedTMS President and CFO.

Headquartered in Marysville, Ohio, ScottsMiracle-Gro Company (NYSE: SMG) is the world’s largest marketer of branded consumer lawn and garden products.

 

 

 

 

 

 

About ReedTMS Logistics Established in 2010, ReedTMS Logistics is an asset-based third-party logistics provider compromised of Reed Transport Services, Inc. and TMS Logistics, Inc. The two companies offer a wide array of transportation services to customers throughout the United States, Canada and Mexico. Headquartered in Tampa, Fla. with offices in Cedar Grove, Wisconsin and Ashland, Ohio. Founded in 1996, Reed Transport offers high-quality brokerage and freight management services. Founded in 1997, TMS Logistics is a multimode carrier specializing in dry van, dedicated fleet services. For more information, visit www.ReedTMS.com.

ReedTMS Logistics Volunteers at Feeding Tampa Bay

ReedTMS Logistics kicked off its fall philanthropic push on Saturday, August 12th by volunteering at Feeding Tampa Bay.

Feeding Tampa Bay, part of the national Feeding America network, focuses on providing food to the more than 700,000 hungry in the 10-county area of West Central Florida.

You might be surprised to learn that Florida is fourth in the nation for family hunger. Or, that 60% of the population in West Central Florida is eligible for food stamps. Many at-risk students won’t eat at all between lunch on Friday and breakfast Monday morning. Although these facts may surprise you, they are hard realities for the one in six in our region who live with daily hunger.

According to the new Hunger in America 2014 study conducted nationally by Feeding America, you would be surprised to learn the characteristics of the 841,000 hungry people in the community served yearly by Feeding Tampa Bay.
Too often, we associate being hungry with negative stereotypes, such as being homeless or uneducated, when that couldn’t be further from the truth. The new Hunger in America data humanizes the hungry in our community by showing they’re largely families or seniors with homes. They truly are our neighbors, our friends, our fellow church members and our coworkers.

Employees at ReedTMS, helped package food into 20 different categories in order for the goods to be easily distributed throughout the community. When it was all said and done 9,823 meals were packaged for malnourished families in the Tampa Bay area on Saturday morning!

For More information about Feeding Tampa Bay and how you can get involved in the cause, please visit their website here.

Story By : Andy Patel

Uber Freight Expanding Into Six Markets This Year

Truck

Uber Freight will expand to Arizona, California, Georgia, North and South Carolina and into the Midwest-Chicago area over the next few months after a test run that began in Texas.

“These new areas represent where drivers like to run, which makes sense: These regions including Texas cover over a quarter of the country’s drivers and freight,” the company wrote in a blog post. “Unlocking this geography allows more carriers and their drivers to grow their businesses with Uber Freight’s instant load booking and quick payment. While today we still have most of our loads in Texas, over the coming months drivers can expect to see an ever-increasing number of loads available on the app in these new markets.”

The transportation giant also said that it has heard from truck drivers who prefer to haul specific types of freight in specific lanes. As a result, Uber announced it will build new features to “automatically learn drivers’ preferences based on their past loads, their location, their home base, and more. When a new load is available that matches these preferences, the app will notify the driver.”

Uber has declined to publicly release data on the number of carriers and shipments brokered so far, but the group told USA Today that load counts have increased tenfold in Texas since January.

Story by Transport Topics

Citrus greening threatening your trees? Florida will send you tiny wasps

Homeowners with citrus trees in their yards can apply online to have a vial of tiny parasitic wasps mailed to them, that can then be released onto citrus trees.

To defend the state’s citrus crop from an industry-crippling infection, scientists with the Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services are fighting pest with parasites.

Florida residents can apply online to the department for tiny parasitic wasps called tamarixia that hunt the Asian citrus psyllid, an invasive insect that spreads the fatal disease “citrus greening.”

The psyllid carries the infection, which plugs the plant’s phloem, starves the tree and causes fruit to drop prematurely. Tamarixia feed on the pest and lay eggs inside young psyllids, killing them and, hopefully, the bacteria that cause the disease, said biological scientist Gloria Lotz.

At a mass-rearing lab in Gainesville, one of a few throughout the state, Lotz and fellow researchers supply over 1 million tamarixia every year to commercial citrus growers and now, Florida residents who want to protect their backyard citrus trees.

The tamarixia release program is one of several tools researchers and growers use to slow greening’s spread, including pesticides to kill the disease-causing bacteria and hydroponic systems to keep infected plants healthy.

But there’s no single solution to a complex problem like citrus greening. It’s infected nearly 100 percent of the state’s mature citrus trees, said Steve Futch, a citrus agent at the UF/IFAS Citrus Research and Education Center in Lake Alfred.

Biocontrol methods usually operate as a “series of waves,” he said; when there are fewer pests, the parasite that hunts them starts to decline, too.

The chances of eradicating the psyllid and the infection with tamarixia are slim, he said — but it should work well in smaller, urban environments, where wasps can fly between citrus trees on different properties.

The citrus industry employs nearly 76,000 growers, truckers, pickers, and packers who face job loss if crop production continues to decline. But Futch said despite the bleak prognosis, Florida’s staple crop will survive—though it may be a bit smaller.

“There will always be a citrus industry in Florida,” he said. “It will be different in the future than it is today and in the past.”

Citrus tree owners can apply here to have a small vial of the tiny wasps sent to their home: http://bit.ly/2vfcI5V

Story By Scottie Andrew, GateHouse Media Services

2017 State of Logistics: Less-than-truckload (LTL)

The once beleaguered $35 billion LTL market is enjoying a revival thanks to its substantial investment in technology, difficult-to-replicate hub-and-spoke networks, the boom in e-commerce as well as other non-traditional growth areas.

Simply put, it’s about market share and pricing power. The top 25 LTL carriers still account for nearly 90% of market share. And with giants FedEx Freight and UPS Freight upping the ante with multi-million dollar investments in technology and operations improvements, the LTL sector continues to enjoy pricing power over shippers that the highly fragment truckload (TL) sector does not.

According to David Ross, veteran LTL analyst for Stifel Inc., 2017 will be “generally good” for LTL carriers, with results improving as the freight year progresses.

“The expectation remains for better times ahead in LTL due to the prospect of lower taxes, reduced regulation, increased capital spending and the administration’s stated focus on domestic jobs, infrastructure and manufacturing,” says Ross. “In theory, these should all work to drive earnings per share higher for LTL carriers—but in practice it may take a while.”

For some leading LTL carriers, it’s already happening. XPO Logistics, the nation’s 2nd-largest group of LTL carriers, earned a profit in the first quarter of a year for the first time since 2010. According to CEO Brad Jacobs, XPO, the former Con-way Inc., is benefitting from the boom in e-commerce, last-mile delivery capability, investment in technology and cross-selling among other XPO units.

Dating back to last year, overall LTL demand is picking up, if only slightly. Fourth quarter daily tonnage and shipments at public LTL carriers rose about 1% on average, but at least both were positive for the first time since the fourth quarter of 2014. Low-single-digit growth rates are forecast for the rest of this year.

Stifel’s Ross says that the key to 2018 growth is an improving manufacturing sector and reduced truckload supply, which might be sufficient enough to cause lighter-weight TL shipments to flow back into LTL networks.

Ross adds that LTL pricing should be higher for the rest of this year. In fact, revenue per hundredweight (yield–not pure price) rose on average 1.8% in the fourth quarter. He’s currently forecasting 2% higher rates this year.

Unlike the TL market, which recently saw a $6 billion merger between Knight and Swift Transportation, analysts are not expecting similar moves in LTL due to the fact that public LTL carriers already have their networks largely built out. Few analysts are expecting any mega-mergers in LTL. “There simply aren’t any benefits,” says Ross, who adds that smaller, “bolt-on acquisitions” could make more sense down the road.

However, Saia—the only public LTL without a national footprint—is moving down the organic expansion path. “Even if Saia buys someone to accelerate its growth into the Mid-Atlantic or Northeast, it probably won’t be a publiccarrier, as they’re all too big,” adds Ross.

Of course, all these LTL companies are chasing Old Dominion Freight Line (ODFL), which posted a sector-leading $195 million in net income last year while posting an 83.8 operating ratio, a mark that leads the LTL sector.

ODFL vice chairman and president David Congdon says that his company formula for success is simple: 99+% on-time service in regional, interregional and national market lanes at competitive rates with low claims. That’s easy to say, but difficult to do consistently in the highly competitive LTL market place.

Story by John D. Schulz at Logistcsmgmt.com

Uber’s CEO is out: Here’s everything that went wrong with Uber this year

As of early this morning, Uber CEO Travis Kalanick is out.

It’s the latest chapter in what has become perhaps the most enticing tech story of the year that, many might argue, begins with the bombshell blog by former Uber engineer Susan Fowler that reveals systemic sexism at Uber.

Things started to sour earlier this year, however. Here’s how it all went down:

Kalanick a lightning rod for Trump criticism

  • December 14: Reports reveal Kalanick is joining Trump’s business advisory board.

If that was a spark, what followed was a forest fire

  • February 19: Former Uber engineer Susan Fowler posts her now-famous blog post detailing sexism within the company.
  • February 20: Uber calls for an internal investigation, known as the “Holder investigation” after former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, who’s leading it.
  • February 23: Alphabet’s Waymo unit files a lawsuit against Uber claiming that a former Waymo employee, Anthony Levandowski, stole secrets related to autonomous vehicle technology.
  • February 27: Uber SVP of engineering Amit Singhal leaves the company after it was revealed that he had left Google a year earlier due to a “credible” sexual harassment complaint.
  • February 28: Travis Kalanick apologizes after he’s caught on film arguing with an Uber driver, Fawzi Kamel, about Uber’s new plans to lower fares. “Some people don’t like to take responsibility for their own s—. They blame everything in their life on somebody else. Good luck,” Kalanick told his driver.
  • March 3: The New York Times reveals that Uber has been using a feature named “Greyball” that showed people it suspected to be government officials a fake version of the app that would deny them a ride. This was used by Uber to operate in areas where its service was deemed illegal without being caught.

Exodus followed by more scandal

  • March 3: On the same day, Charlie Miller, Uber vice president of product and growth and self-driving senior engineer, leaves the company.
  • March 8: Artificial intelligence labs director Gary Marcus leaves the company.
  • March 16: Self-driving director Raffi Krikorian leaves.
  • March 19: Uber president Jeff Jones departs the company.
  • March 20: Uber’s vice president of maps and business platforms, Brian McClendon, leaves.
  • March 24: Gabi Holzwarth, who dated Kalanick for several years, revealed to The Information that she, Kalanick, and five Uber executives who had traveled to Seoul in 2014 visited an escort bar while there. A female marketing executive who was in the group told Holzwarth later that she felt Uber tried to silence her complaints.
  • May 15: Judge blocks Levandowski from working on any technology related to LIDAR, which is key to the development of Uber’s autonomous vehicles.
  • May 30: Uber fires Levandowski, stating that he didn’t fully cooperate with the court or with helping Uber to prove its case.
  • June 8: Bombshell letter reveals the type of boss Kalanick was. In the letter, dated 2013, Kalanick discusses a company trip to Miami and lays out ground rules for consensual employee sex practices. “Have a great f–king time,” he says.
  • June 1: Uber board meets to begin discussing the findings of the Holder report before it is released to the company. During the meeting, David Bonderman makes sexist remarks about women.

The Holder Investigation report is released

  • June 6: Uber says more than 20 staff members have been fired as part of the internal investigation.
  • June 13: The Holder report is released, and it makes 47 recommendations to help Uber improve its values and workplace environment. Kalanick, who recently lost his mother, decides to step away from the company temporarily. Uber says his duties will be replaced by an independent chair.
  • June 14: The Federal Trade Commission begins looking into Uber’s privacy practices, possibly digging deeper into the company’s “god view” tool and other concerns, according to Recode.
  • June 15: A rape victim filed a lawsuit against Uber after she found out that executives had taken her medical records. The 26-year-old woman was raped by an Uber driver in India in 2014, and the driver was convicted of the crime.

Travis Kalanick resigns

  • June 21: Founder and former CEO Travis Kalanick resigns. “I love Uber more than anything in the world and at this difficult moment in my personal life I have accepted the investors request to step aside so that Uber can go back to building rather than be distracted with another fight,” Kalanick said in a statement obtained by The New York Times.

Story by : Todd Haselton at Cnbc.com